Пн. Фев 26th, 2024

In the midst of the Cold War, Bruce Beach left the USA with a mission: to create a secure space for his family in case of a global catastrophe. Now, 50 years later, the 86-year-old is still working tirelessly on his project, despite government intervention and threats of prison time. Beach’s creation, known as Arc II, is a massive underground bunker made from 42 blast-proof school buses, located in the rural town of Warningsville, Ontario.

Born in Winfield, Kansas, Beach was motivated by the looming threat of the Cold War and the Vietnam War. Seeking safety for his family, he relocated to Canada, specifically the isolated town of Warningsville. However, this move was not the end of Beach’s plan; it was just the beginning.

Even before his family settled in Warningsville, Beach began a peculiar collection – school buses. Over the course of five years, he acquired 42 school buses, each made from reinforced steel, which he considered blast-proof. The purpose behind this unique collection remained a secret until he started digging a 14-foot pit next to his home.

The buses were arranged underground in a carefully designed structure named Arc II. Beach’s plan was to create a self-sufficient bunker capable of accommodating 500 people, with the potential to expand further. The buses served as a shield against external threats, and Beach’s vision was to provide a safe haven for those seeking refuge during catastrophic events.

Over the years, Beach faced numerous challenges, from floods and fires to acts of burglary. However, his most significant battles have been legal. The government has taken him to court over 30 times, citing safety hazards and the lack of proper building permits. Despite heavy fines and legal pressure, Beach remains unwavering in his dedication to Arc II.

Arc II is equipped with a decontamination zone featuring seven screening entrances, ensuring that only disease-free individuals can enter. The underground complex has a fully functional plumbing system, three months’ worth of diesel generators, kitchens capable of feeding 500 people three times a day, and even facilities for children, including play areas, nurseries, and classrooms.

In Beach’s vision for Arc II, men and women are separated, and families are divided to maximize space efficiency. The underground city includes a dentist chair, a mortuary, and even a jail cell. The structure is designed to be a temporary refuge until help arrives, with communication systems in place to connect with the outside world using AM and FM frequencies.

Despite strained family relationships and the depletion of his life savings, Beach continues to fight for the completion of Arc II. His dedication to the project has turned it into a symbol among the Doomsday Prepper community, a group of individuals who believe in preparing for global catastrophes.

As Bruce Beach faces legal battles and opposition from the authorities, the fate of Arc II hangs in the balance. Yet, the 86-year-old remains resolute, convinced that his bunker is a necessary safeguard for an uncertain future.